Molecular remodeling of adipose tissue is associated with metabolic recovery after weight loss surgery

Authors: Bouchard-Mercier, AnnieToro Martín, Juan deNadeau, MélanieLescelleur, OdetteLebel, StéfaneRichard, DenisBiertho, LaurentTchernof, AndréVohl, Marie-Claude
Abstract: Background Bariatric surgery is an effective therapy for individuals with severe obesity to achieve sustainable weight loss and to reduce comorbidities. Examining the molecular signature of subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) following different types of bariatric surgery may help in gaining further insight into their distinct metabolic impact. Results Subjects undergoing biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) showed a significantly higher percentage of total weight loss than those undergoing gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy (RYGB + SG) (41.7 ± 4.6 vs 28.2 ± 6.8%; p = 0.00005). Individuals losing more weight were also significantly more prone to achieve both type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia remission (OR = 0.75; 95%CI = 0.51–0.91; p = 0.03). Whole transcriptome and methylome profiling showed that bariatric surgery induced a profound molecular remodeling of SAT at 12 months postoperative, mainly through gene down-regulation and hypermethylation. The extent of changes observed was greater following BPD-DS, with 61.1% and 49.8% of up- and down-regulated genes, as well as 85.7% and 70.4% of hyper- and hypomethylated genes being exclusive to this procedure, and mostly associated with a marked decrease of immune and inflammatory responses. Weight loss was strongly associated with genes being simultaneously differentially expressed and methylated in BPD-DS, with the strongest association being observed for GPD1L (r²=0.83; p=1.4x10⁻⁶). Conclusions Present findings point to the greater SAT molecular remodeling following BPD-DS as potentially linked with higher metabolic remission rates. These results will contribute to a better understanding of the metabolic pathways involved in the response to bariatric surgery and will eventually lead to the development of gene targets for the treatment of obesity.
Document Type: Article de recherche
Issue Date: 23 June 2022
Open Access Date: 3 August 2022
Document version: AM
Creative Commons Licence: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0
Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11794/74042
This document was published in: Journal of translational medecine, (2022)
https://doi.org/10.1186/s12967-022-03485-6
Springer Nature
Alternative version: 10.1186/s12967-022-03485-6
Collection:Articles publiés dans des revues avec comité de lecture

Files in this item:
Description SizeFormat 
Bouchard-Mercier_Toro-Martin_2022.pdf384.55 kBAdobe PDFThumbnail
View/Open
All documents in CorpusUL are protected by Copyright Act of Canada.