On the selection of words and oral motor responses : evidence of a response-independent fronto-parietal network

Authors: Tremblay, Pascale; Gracco, Vincent L.
Abstract: Several brain areas including the medial and lateral premotor areas, and the prefrontal cortex, are thought to be involved in response selection. It is unclear, however, what the specific contribution of each of these areas is. It is also unclear whether the response selection process operates independent of response modality or whether a number of specialized processes are recruited depending on the behaviour of interest. In the present study, the neural substrates for different response selection modes (volitional and stim- ulus-driven) were compared, using sparse-sampling functional magnetic resonance imaging, for two different response modalities: words and comparable oral motor gestures. Results demonstrate that response selection relies on a network of prefrontal, premotor and parietal areas, with the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) at the core of the process. Overall, this network is sensitive to the manner in which responses are selected, despite the absence of a medio-lateral axis, as was suggested by Goldberg (1985). In contrast, this network shows little sensitivity to the modality of the response, suggesting of a domain-general selection process. Theoretical implications of these results are discussed.
Document Type: Article de recherche
Issue Date: 18 March 2009
Open Access Date: 7 January 2021
Document version: AM
Creative Commons Licence: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0
Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11794/67639
This document was published in: Cortex, Vol. 46 (1), 15-28 (2010)
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2009.03.003
Tipografica Varese
Alternative version: 10.1016/j.cortex.2009.03.003
19362298
Collection:Articles publiés dans des revues avec comité de lecture

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