Efficience de la recherche dans les écoles de gestion au Canada : modélisation par des approches paramétriques et non-paramétriques

Authors: Rhaiem, Mehdi
Advisor: Amara, Nabil
Abstract: The production of knowledge is of great importance to governments, universities and researchers. For the latter, today more than ever, research is becoming more and more important in their portfolios of activities. A number of factors are driving this new trend, including the introduction of productivity-driven research funding systems in a number of countries, global competition for research, the proliferation of standardized tools for assessing scientific excellence, and the importance of research performance and productivity in researchers’ career path success. However, the performance of university researchers varies greatly between disciplines and within the same discipline. These findings reinforce the relevance of questioning the allocation and management of resources in the field of university research. This study addresses this issue in the specific context of research in Canadian Business Schools. Its aims, on the one hand, to draw a detailed portrait of the advancement of knowledge on the concept of the efficiency of academic research and to identify the main milestones that have marked its evolution over the last two decades and, on the other hand, to evaluate the efficiency of academic research of Canadian Business Schools’ scholars and to identify the determinants that may explain the differences in efficiency between them. The thesis allowed the production of three articles. The first one used the systematic review of the literature and the method of vote counting to build an integrative conceptual framework of inputs, outputs, and determinants of the efficiency of academic research. It has also identified several research opportunities to contribute to the advancement of knowledge in this field of study. The second article used a new method, The Reference Publication Year Spectroscopy, to study in depth the concept of the efficiency of academic research by identifying its historical roots as well as the contributions that marked its evolution. These first two articles made it possible to satisfy the first part of the general objective of this research: “to draw a detailed portrait of the advancement of knowledge on the concept of the efficiency of academic research and to identify the main milestones that have marked its evolution over the last two decades”. Taking advantage of the findings and potential contributions to the advancement of knowledge identified in the first two articles, the third article estimated parametric and non-parametric frontiers of efficiency of scholars’ publications and citations in eight research disciplines in Canadian Business schools. It also allowed to identify several levers of efficiency gaps among researchers affiliated with these schools. Among other things, the results of this third article showed that efficiency scores differ significantly from one disciplinary field to another, and even within disciplinary fields, and that AACSB accreditation, affiliation to prestigious universities, size of institution, sources of funding and seniority are positively associated with high levels of efficiency. The findings of the three articles devised some lines of action that might improve the efficiency of academic research for researchers in general and those affiliated with Canadian Business schools, in particular.
Document Type: Thèse de doctorat
Issue Date: 2018
Open Access Date: Restricted access
Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11794/36193
Grantor: Université Laval
Collection:Thèses et mémoires

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