Métabolisme et signalisation cellulaire dans le quadriceps des patients atteints de la maladie pulmonaire obstructive chronique

Authors: Lemire, Bruno
Advisor: Maltais, FrançoisDebigaré, Richard
Abstract: Peripheral muscle dysfunction is one of the most important systemic manifestations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). This dysfunction brings many muscle abnormalities at the clinical, structural, metabolic and biochemical levels. These abnormalities contribute to the exercise intolerance, loss of muscle mass and force as well as diminishing quality of life of patients with COPD. This thesis as for general objective the investigation of peripheral muscle dysfunction in COPD, more precisely 1) the study of signalling pathways involved in muscle atrophy 2) the study of muscle metabolism in response to endurance exercise involved in exercise intolerance and 3) the study of muscle cellular adaptations to resistance exercise involved in the less than optimal response following resistance training in patients with COPD. First, we showed the possible contribution of the MAPKs, more precisely p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 and JNK, to the peripheral muscle dysfunction in COPD. The phosphorylation levels as well as the mRNA expression of these key proteins are elevated in patients with COPD compared to age-matched healthy controls. We also demonstrated that SAA1 could have a possible role in the peripheral muscle dysfunction in COPD. Secondly, we observed that patients with COPD have a greater reliance on the muscle glycolytic metabolism during an endurance exercise done until exhaustion, therefore possibly contributing to the exercise intolerance seen in patients with COPD. Lastly, we demonstrated that the cellular adaptation in response to resistance exercise training is different for proteins involved in muscle mass regulation in patients with COPD compared to age-matched healthy controls, thus possibly contributing to the less-than-optimal response to resistance exercise training in patients with COPD. This thesis puts at the forefront the signalling pathways and inflammatory markers contributing to the inherent peripheral muscle dysfunction in patients with COPD, as well as the investigation of exercise response in patients with COPD. These results will add to the scientific knowledge of the metabolic and cellular aspects of peripheral muscle dysfunction in COPD.
Document Type: Thèse de doctorat
Issue Date: 2013
Open Access Date: 19 April 2018
Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11794/24430
Grantor: Université Laval
Collection:Thèses et mémoires

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