A role for DLK in microtubule reorganization to the cell periphery and in the maintenance of desmosomal and tight junction integrity

Authors: Simard-Bisson, CarolyneBidoggia, JulieLarouche, DanielleGuérin, SylvainBlouin, Richard; Hirai, Syu-Ichi; Germain, Lucie
Abstract: Dual leucine zipper-bearing kinase (DLK) is an inducer of keratinocyte differentiation, a complex process also involving microtubule reorganization to the cell periphery. However, signaling mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that DLK enhances and is required for microtubule reorganization to the cell periphery in human cell culture models and in Dlk knockout mouse embryos. In tissue-engineered skins with reduced DLK expression, cortical distribution of two microtubule regulators, LIS1 and HSP27, is impaired as well as desmosomal and tight junction integrity. Altered cortical distribution of desmosomal and tight junction proteins was also confirmed in Dlk knockout mouse embryos. Finally, desmosomal and tight junction defects were also observed after microtubule disruption in nocodazole-treated tissue-engineered skins, thus confirming a role for microtubules in the maintenance of these types of cell junctions. Globally, this study demonstrates that DLK is a key regulator of microtubule reorganization to the cell periphery during keratinocyte differentiation and that this process is required for the maintenance of desmosomal and tight junction integrity.
Document Type: Article de recherche
Issue Date: 7 October 2016
Open Access Date: Restricted access
Document version: VoR
Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11794/16868
This document was published in: Journal of Investigative Dermatology, Vol. 137 (1), 132–141 (2017)
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jid.2016.07.035
Elsevier Science
Alternative version: 10.1016/j.jid.2016.07.035
27519653
Collection:Articles publiés dans des revues avec comité de lecture

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