Gender differences in the effects of repeated taste exposure to the Mediterranean diet : a 6-month follow-up study

Authors: Bédard, AlexandraCorneau, LouiseDodin-Dewailly, SylvieLemieux, Simone
Abstract: Purpose: To determine whether an intervention based mainly on exposure to the Mediterranean diet (MedDiet), along with recommendations/tools for encouraging healthy eating, lead to different effects on dietary adherence and body weight management six months post-intervention in Canadian men and women. Methods: Thirty-eight men and 32 premenopausal women (24-53 years) were exposed to the same 4-week experimental MedDiet during which all foods were provided to participants. Participants also received some recommendations/tools to adhere to a healthy way of eating, with no other contact until the 6-month follow-up visit. Results: Compared to baseline, the Mediterranean score (MedScore) had increased at the end of the 6-month follow-up (time effect P=0.003), with no gender difference (gender-by-time interaction P=0.97). Although our intervention was not focused on body weight management, compared to baseline, BMI decreased during the intervention in both men and women (respectively P<0.0001 and P=0.03); however, only the female participants of this study managed to maintain the lower BMI, six months after the intervention (P=0.03 for women; gender-by-time interaction P=0.04). Conclusions: Exposure to the MedDiet for a short duration promotes the adherence to this food pattern in both genders and helps in the management of body weight, especially in women.
Document Type: Article de recherche
Issue Date: 19 August 2016
Open Access Date: 10 April 2017
Document version: AM
Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11794/13577
This document was published in: Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research, Vol. 77 (3), 125–132(2016)
https://doi.org/10.3148/cjdpr-2015-052
Diétistes du Canada
Alternative version: 10.3148/cjdpr-2015-052
26916988
Collection:Articles publiés dans des revues avec comité de lecture

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