Publication :
Correlates of sugar-sweetened beverages consumption among adolescents

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Date
2020-05-08
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CABI Publishing
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Résumé
Objective: To identify correlates and underlying beliefs regarding the adolescents’ intention to abstain from consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and the consumption of ≤1 daily portion of SSB. Design: Correlational study. Setting: Region of Chaudière-Appalaches in the province of Quebec, Canada. Participants: 311 adolescents aged 13–18 years completed a self-administrated online questionnaire based on the Reasoned Action Approach. Frequency and quantity of different types of SSB within the past month were measured. Results: Total mean SSB intake was 882·6 ml/d (654·0 kJ/d ). Only 11·3 % abstained from SSB within the last month. Intention to abstain from SSB was explained by identification as SSB abstainers ( β = 0·47), perceived norm ( β = 0·32), attitude ( β = 0·30), age 13–14 years ( β = –0·27) and perception of the school environment ( β = 0·14), which explained 66 % of the variance. Consumption of ≤1 daily portion of SSB was explained by the intention to abstain (OR = 1·55; 95 % CI 1·14, 2·11), perceived behavioural control to abstain (OR = 1·80; 95 % CI 1·29, 2·52), sex (girls v. boys: OR = 2·34; 95 % CI 1·37, 3·98) and socio-economic status (advantaged v. disadvantaged school: OR = 2·08; 95 % CI 1·21, 3·56). Underlying beliefs (i.e. more energy, decreased risk of addiction and friends’ approval) associated with intention as well as perceived barriers (e.g. access to SSB, after an activity that makes you thirsty), and facilitating factors (e.g. access to water) linked to SSB consumption were identified. Conclusions: The results can inform public health interventions to decrease SSB consumption and their associated health problems among adolescents.
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Revue
Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 23 (12), 2145-2154 (2020)
DOI
10.1017/S1368980019005147
URL vers la version publiée
Mots-clés
Adolescents , Sugar-sweetened beverages , Reasoned action approach , Intention , Beliefs , School environment
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Type de document
article de recherche