Personne :
LeBel, Luc

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LeBel
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Luc
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Université Laval. Département des sciences du bois et de la forêt
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ncf10571970
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Résultats de recherche

Voici les éléments 1 - 8 sur 8
  • Publication
    Restreint
    On the risk of systematic drift under incoherent hierarchical forest management planning
    (National Research Council Canada, 2013-02-23) Bouchard, Mathieu; Paradis, Gregory; D'Amours, Sophie; LeBel, Luc
    In theory, linkages between hierarchical forest management planning levels ensure coherent disaggregation of long-term wood supply allocation as input for short-term demand-driven harvest planning. In practice, these linkages may be ineffective, and solutions produced may be incoherent in terms of volume and value-creation potential of harvested timber. Systematic incoherence between planned and implemented forest management activities may induce drift of forest system state (i.e., divergence of planned and actual system state trajectories), thus compromising credibility and performance of the forest management planning process. We describe hierarchical forest management from a game-theoretic perspective and present an iterative two-phase model simulating interaction between long- and short-term planning processes. Using an illustrative case study, we confirm the existence of a systematic drift effect, which we attribute to ineffective linkages between long- and short-term planning. In several simulated scenarios, the planning process fails to ensure long-term wood supply sustainability, fails to reliably meet industrial fiber demand over time, and exacerbates incoherence between wood supply and fiber demand over several planning iterations. We show that manipulating linkages between long- and short-term planning processes can reduce incoherence and describe future work on game-theoretic planning process model formulations that may improve hierarchical planning process performance.
  • Publication
    Restreint
    A bi-level model formulation for the distributed wood supply planning problem
    (National Research Council of Canada, 2017-10-31) Bouchard, Mathieu; Paradis, Gregory; D'Amours, Sophie; LeBel, Luc
    The classic wood supply optimisation model maximises even-flow harvest levels and implicitly assumes infinite fibre demand. In many jurisdictions, this modelling assumption is a poor fit for actual fibre consumption, which is typically a subset of total fibre allocation. Failure of the model to anticipate this bias in industrial wood fibre consumption has been linked to increased risk of wood supply failure. In particular, we examine the distributed wood supply planning problem where the roles of forest owner and fibre consumer are played by independent agents. We use game theory to frame interactions between public forest land managers and industrial fibre consumers. We show that the distributed wood supply planning problem can be modelled more accurately using a bi-level formulation and present an extension of the classic wood supply optimisation model that explicitly anticipates industrial fibre consumption behaviour. We present a solution methodology that can solve a convex special case of the problem to global optimality and compare output and solution times of classic and bi-level model formulations using a computational experiment on a realistic dataset. Experimental results show that the bi-level formulation can mitigate risk of wood supply failure.
  • Publication
    Restreint
    Planning systems, agility and customisation in wood supply chains – results from six international case studies
    (2013-07-01) Rönnqvist, Mikael; Moreira, Matheus; Audy, Jean-François.; Westlund, Karin; D'Amours, Sophie; LeBel, Luc
    This paper is based on wood supply chain (WSC) data collected in six countries (Canada, Chile, France, Poland, Sweden, and USA) where a total of 94 local actors and experts were consulted. For each WSC studied, processes for operational plan-ning and execution of the procurement activities were mapped. Descriptions of the information, material and financial flows were also completed. Three basic designs of planning systems were identified, and for each design, a decision matrix was de-vised. WSC agility capabilities were assessed according to a four dimensions refer-ence model and compared with those theoretically required by the environment's uncertainties. When comparing location of the decoupling point, agility capabilities, and average order fulfilment cycle time of each WSC, it was possible to reinforce results found in the literature which state that supply chain agility is linked to shorter order fulfilment cycle time. Finally, the personalisation capabilities of each WSC were assessed and two key processes were identified where most of the product differen-tiation activities along a WSC occur.
  • Publication
    Restreint
    Chaînes de création de valeur
    (Éditions MultiMondes, 2009-01-01) Martel, Alain; Frayret, Jean-Marc; Gaudreault, Jonathan; D'Amours, Sophie; LeBel, Luc
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Exploring new forms of intermediation in the forest value chain
    (Pulp and Paper Technical Association of Canada, 2018) D'Amours, Sophie; LeBel, Luc; Azouzi, Riadh.
    This paper proposes a method to restructure the forest value chain using intermediaries when a wider range of forest values should be managed for several stakeholders. This method leads to the definition of the strategic vision of the intermediary, including its value proposition and its required competencies, assuming that actors in the value chain are prepared to revise their business approach to enable effective collaboration and knowledge sharing. The method is used to support management of public forests in the Province of Quebec, in Eastern Canada. Basically, the intermediary, referred to as the integrator-supplier (IS) in the application case, enables several stakeholders, including the government, the forest industry, regional authorities, recreation organizations, and First Nations, to cnmmunicate, to set compatible goals, and to synchronize their activities. These activities and interactions must all be effectively carried out to maximize the overall benefits of forest management. Three critical issues for successful development of the IS are identified. The results present functional descriptions of seven development scenarios for effective use of intermediation in forest value chains.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Extending the classic wood supply model to anticipate industrial fibre consumption
    (Centre interuniversitaire de recherche sur les réseaux d'entreprise, la logistique et le transport, 2015-02-01) Bouchard, Mathieu; Paradis, Gregory; D'Amours, Sophie; LeBel, Luc
    The classic wood supply optimisation model maximises even-flow harvest levels, and implicitly assumes infinite fibre demand. In many jurisdictions, this modelling assumption is a poor fit for actual fibre consumption, which is often a species-unbalanced subset of total fibre allocation. Failure to anticipate this bias in volume and species mix of industrial wood fibre consumption has been linked to increased risk of wood supply failure. In particular, we examine the distributed wood supply planning problem, which is a variant of the general wood supply planning problem where the roles of forest owner and fibre consumer are played by independent agents (e.g. wood supply planning on public forest land in Canada, where government stewards control wood supply and forest products industry firms consume the fibre). We use agency theory to describe the source of antagonism between public forest land owners (the principal) and industrial fibre consumers (the agent). We show that the distributed wood supply planning problem can be modelled more accurately using a bilevel formulation, and present an extension of the classic wood supply optimisation model which explicitly anticipates industrial fibre consumption behaviour. The general case of the bilevel wood supply optimisation problem is NP-hard, non-linear, and non-convex-it is difficult to solve to global optimality. By imposing certain restrictions on agent network topology, we show that the general case can be decomposed into convex sub-problems. We present a solution methodology that can solve this special case to global optimality, and compare output and solution times of classic and bilevel model formulations using a computational experiment on a realistic dataset. Experimental results show that solution time for the bilevel problem is comparable to solution time for the classic single-level problem, and that the bilevel formulation can mitigate risk of wood supply failure.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Alternative logistics concepts fitting different wood supply situations and markets
    (Centre interuniversitaire de recherche sur les réseaux d'entreprise la logistique et le transport, 2012-06-01) Rönnqvist, Mikael; Pinotti Moreira, Matheus; Audy, Jean-François.; Westlund, Karin; D'Amours, Sophie; LeBel, Luc
    In this research project, we developed a framework for describing different wood supply chains (WSC) in a generic way and assessing their agility and tailoring capabilities. The studied WSC comprises the planning and execution, at the operational level, of all activities, from selling agreements to delivery of forest products at the mill yard. required by the environment’s uncertainties are compared and discussed. Finally, tailoring capabilities were assessed, based on the location of the decoupling points and their respective order fulfilment cycle time. Two processes were identified, where most of the product differentiation activities along a WSC occur: harvesting with the CTL method and merchandising at a roadside landing using the FT method. The capabilities to tailor product specifications are superior before rather than after one of these processes. Moreover, a typology of assortments according to the level of tailoring is provided and the financial incentive to produce a basket of assortments with a higher level of tailoring is discussed. Finally, when comparing the location of the decoupling point, the agility capabilities and the average order fulfilment cycle time, it was possible to reinforce the results from the literature, which state that supply chain agility is linked to shorter leadtime. The framework is useful to organisations interested in describing their WSC and assessing their agility and tailoring capabilities. By assessing the tailoring and agility capabilities of a WSC, the framework can support an organisation in an exercise of selfdiagnosis that leads to the identification of improvement opportunities to work on. Moreover, by assessing different scenarios for its WSC (e.g. the introduction of new technology, the addition of a new value proposition for a customer), an organisation can anticipate the impacts of changes. Finally, the framework introduced a common vocabulary to be used by researchers and practitioners in different disciplines (e.g. forest engineering, management sciences, industrial engineering). It represents an original attempt to develop a reference model for future research addressing WSCs. These include the purchase or selection of harvesting blocks, harvesting scheduling and execution, as well as transportation scheduling and execution. The framework includes a set of descriptive templates including e.g. a description of the actors, their planning and execution processes, the decoupling points used, together with information, material and financial flows. The proposed framework was applied to case studies in six countries (Canada, Chile, France, Poland, Sweden and USA) where fieldwork allowed us to collect information from 94 local actors and experts. The case studies allowed a list of options (i.e. catalogues) to be generated for different descriptive elements within the framework. We generated catalogues of 16 types of actors involved in a WSC, seven locations of decoupling points, four types of value commitment processes, eight standing timber and harvest timber pricing mechanisms and several payment methods for standing timber, harvested timber, harvesting and primary and secondary transportation. We also developed 17 generic processes for any planning and execution activities within a WSC, as well as 13 generic planning decisions at the operational level. Three basic designs of planning systems were identified: 1) integrated sourcing and harvesting planning, 2) integrated harvesting and transportation planning, and 3) decoupled sourcing, harvesting and transportation planning. We also identified six logistics techniques to adjust supply to demand. The agility capabilities of the WSC were assessed in four dimensions: customer sensitivity, process integration, information drivers and network integration. The developed methodology used a 0-4 scale to rate how well different enablers and practices, identified along the main processes within a WSC, contributed to each of these four dimensions. A WSC should strive towards proper agility capabilities in response to uncertainty in their environment. The agility capabilities evaluated in the case studies and those theoretically
  • Publication
    Restreint
    Integrated forest biorefinery supply chain network design using mathematical programming approach
    (CRC Press, 2012-12-10) Feng, Yan; Nour El Fath, Mustapha; D'Amours, Sophie; LeBel, Luc