Personne :
Rouleau, Nancie

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Rouleau
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Nancie
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Université Laval. École de psychologie
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Identifiant Canadiana
ncf11856244
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Résultats de recherche

Voici les éléments 1 - 3 sur 3
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Sleep, attention, and executive functioning in children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
    (Oxford University Press, 2013-08-08) Morin, Charles M.; Rouleau, Nancie; Moreau, Vincent
    The objective of this study was to investigate potential relationships between two measures of sleep impairments (i.e., sleep duration and sleep efficiency [SE]) and attention and executive functioning in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Parents of 43 children (mean age = 10 ± 1.8 years) with ADHD completed sleep and behavioral questionnaires. Children also wore a wrist actigraph for seven nights and were subsequently assessed with the Conners' continuous performance test (CPT)-2. A significant relationship was found between lower SE and increased variability in reaction time on the CPT. Shorter sleep duration was associated with a range of executive functioning problems as reported by the parents. The relationships between sleep duration and the executive functioning measures held even after controlling for age, gender, and use of medication, but not the relationships with SE. These results suggest that sleep quantity is an important correlate of executive functioning in children with ADHD.
  • Publication
    Restreint
    Cognitive structure from childhood to adulthood in kindreds densely affected by schizophrenia and bipolar disorder
    (Elsevier Ltd., 2015-07-23) Mérette, Chantal; Jomphe, Valérie; Moreau, Isabel; Gilbert, Elsa; Paccalet, Thomas; Roy, Marc-André; Rouleau, Nancie; Cellard, Caroline; Maziade, Michel
    The developmental aspects of cognitive structures from childhood until adulthood and across different levels of risk for psychopathology have been little studied. The aim of the current study was to explore the cognitive factorial structure in subsamples from highly familial and densely affected kindreds of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder – i.e. affected adult members, non-affected adult members and high-risk youth. The same neuropsychological battery was administered in a sample of 480 participants: schizophrenia and bipolar patients (n=51), young high-risk offspring (n=61), non-affected adult relatives of patients (n=96), and controls (n=272). Exploratory Factorial Analysis was performed in the control sample and yielded a 5-factor solution: verbal comprehension, processing speed/working memory, visual learning and memory, verbal learning and memory, reasoning and problem solving. Confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the hierarchical 5-factor solution was well suited for the young high-risk offspring, the non-affected adult relatives of patient and the patients. A hierarchical model with a “g” factor was a good fit for all subsamples. These results suggest that cognitive impairments may aggregate in highly familial individuals.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Sleep of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder : actigraphic and parental reports
    (Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2013-03-08) Morin, Charles M.; Rouleau, Nancie; Moreau, Vincent
    The objectives of this study were to characterize the sleep of children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), using actigraphy and parental questionnaires, and examine the potentially moderating role of psychostimulant medication and psychiatric comorbidity. Children with ADHD significantly differed from controls on parental and actigraphic measures of sleep, with parental reports indicating more severe sleep disturbances, and actigraphic recordings of longer sleep onset latency, lower sleep efficiency, and lower total sleep time. Both medicated and unmedicated ADHD subgroups differed from the control group on sleep measures, but did not differ from each other. Only the subgroup with comorbid psychiatric symptoms differed from the control group on actigraphic measures. The presence of psychiatric comorbidity, but not psychostimulant medication use, was associated with more severe sleep disturbances. The main implication of these findings is that clinicians should systematically attend to sleep disturbances in children with ADHD, particularly when other psychiatric symptoms are also present.