Personne :
Turgeon, Sylvie

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Turgeon
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Sylvie
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Université Laval. Département des sciences des aliments
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ncf10325454
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Résultats de recherche

Voici les éléments 1 - 3 sur 3
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Characterization of syneresis phenomena in stirred acid milk gel using low frequency nuclear magnetic resonance on hydrogen and image analyses
    (Oxford : IRL Press, 2020-04-15) Gilbert, Audrey; Rioux, Laurie-Eve; St-Gelais, Daniel; Turgeon, Sylvie
    Water retention is an important quality attribute for yogurt. Classically, stirred yogurt water retention is investigated using induced syneresis measurement (centrifugation), which does not characterize spontaneous syneresis. Low-frequency nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-LF-NMR) is a non-destructive technique to detect spontaneous syneresis. Experimental yogurt from pasteurized skim milk, and commercial stirred yogurts were analyzed with 1H-LF-NMR. After Laplace's transformation of the signal, hydrogen atoms pools were differentiated according to their mobility. Each hydrogen pool stood for a type of water mobility in the matrices characterized by a relaxation time (T2(i)), and a signal intensity (I2(i)). Yogurt water retention was assessed by induced syneresis and their structure was characterized using microscopy. Low frequency 1H-NMR detected four different water mobility groups in the matrices. Among these, there was a signal from bulk water, and another attributed to the separated serum (spontaneous syneresis). In experimental yogurts, spontaneous syneresis was visible, resulting in induced syneresis higher than 50%. Moreover, induced syneresis and spontaneous syneresis detected by 1H-LF-NMR were similar. In commercial yogurts, bulk water mobility reduced with increasing protein content and protein network density. Induced syneresis and bulk-water mobility correlated only in yogurts without gelatin. In the presence of gelatin, the network was more open, probably favoring bulk water mobility. This study shows that 1H-LF-NMR associated with microscopy image analysis efficiently assesses and describes yogurts water retention and spontaneous syneresis.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    How do smoothing conditions and storage time change syneresis, rheological and microstructural properties of nonfat stirred acid milk gel?
    (Barking, Essex, England : Elsevier Applied Science, 2020-07-16) Guénard Lampron, Valérie; Bosc, Véronique; St-Gelais, Daniel; Villeneuve, Sébastien; Turgeon, Sylvie
    Nonfat acid milk gel, acidified by GDL, was used to simulate microbial fermentation of milk to produce stirred yoghurt. Acid milk gel preparation at laboratory scale included stirring, pumping, smoothing and cooling operations. Two filters (pre-smoothed, 1 mm; smoothed, 500 μm), three smoothing temperatures (13, 22 and 35 °C) and two storage times (1 and 22 days) were studied. Syneresis, microgels size and smoothness of microgels were analysed for pre-smoothed and smoothed gels; viscosity, storage modulus, firmness and total pore area were only analysed for smoothed gel. After 1 and 22 days of storage, pre-smoothed gels developed lower syneresis and smaller microgels than smoothed gels at 22 °C. For smoothed gels, regardless of the smoothing temperature, syneresis, firmness, microgels size and smoothness increased during storage, while total pore area decreased and viscosity remained stable. Viscosity was lower when smoothing was performed at 35 °C and was correlated to rougher microgels.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Studying stirred yogurt microstructure and its correlation to physical properties : a review
    ([Oxford] : Elsevier Ltd., 2021-06-19) Gilbert, Audrey; Turgeon, Sylvie
    Microstructure is an important part of the understanding and the control of food properties as rheological properties, water holding and sensory properties. Stirred yogurt microstructure is being under study for decades. Observations at several length scales have been used to probe the structure. Some methods using optical techniques were recently introduced to provide a quick microstructure assessment of stirred yogurt. This review aims to provide a description of stirred yogurt microstructure and a short overview of the main techniques to characterize stirred yogurt microstructure allowing to highlight their complementarity. In general, stirred yogurt microstructure is described as a suspension of interconnected microgels into a continuous serum phase. While the relationship between yogurt microstructure and its physical and sensory properties has been discussed in numerous reviews, models or studies the impact of microgels sizes on rheological properties, water holding capacity, and creaminess, has not always been confirmed. Even if, other features such as microgels aggregation, shape, and compaction have shown to be involved in sensory or physical properties of stirred yogurt gel, a challenge remains for the characterization of microstructural characteristics of microgels without destructuring the network.