Personne :
Turgeon, Sylvie

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Turgeon
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Sylvie
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Université Laval. Département des sciences des aliments
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ncf10325454
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Voici les éléments 1 - 6 sur 6
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Effect of calcium on fatty acid bioaccessibility during in vitro digestion of Cheddar-type cheeses prepared with different milk fat fractions
    (Urbana, Ill. : American Dairy Science Association, 2017-03-18) Ayala-Bribiesca, Erik; Britten, Michel; Turgeon, Sylvie
    Calcium plays an important role in intestinal lipid digestion by increasing the lipolysis rate, but also limits fatty acid bioaccessibility by producing insoluble Ca soaps with long-chain fatty acids at intestinal pH conditions. The aim of this study was to better understand the effect of Ca on the bioaccessibility of milk fat from Cheddar-type cheeses. Three anhydrous milk fats (AMF) with different fatty acid profiles (olein, stearin, or control AMF) were used to prepare Cheddar-type cheeses, which were then enriched or not with Ca using CaCl2 during the salting step. The cheeses were digested in vitro, and their disintegration and lipolysis rates were monitored during the process. At the end of digestion, lipids were extracted under neutral and acidic pH conditions to compare free fatty acids under intestinal conditions in relation to total fatty acids released during the digestion process. The cheeses prepared with the stearin (the AMF with the highest ratio of long-chain fatty acids) were more resistant to disintegration than the other cheeses, owing to the high melting temperature of that AMF. The Ca-enriched cheeses had faster lipolysis rates than the regular Ca cheeses. Chromatographic analysis of the digestion products showed that Ca interacted with long-chain fatty acids, producing Ca soaps, whereas no interaction with shorter fatty acids was detected. Although higher Ca levels resulted in faster lipolysis rates, driven by the depletion of reaction products as Ca soaps, such insoluble compounds are expected to reduce the bioavailability of fatty acids by hindering their absorption. These effects on lipid digestion and absorption are of interest for the design of food matrices for the controlled release of fat-soluble nutrients or bioactive molecules.
  • Publication
    Restreint
    Commercial cheeses with different texture have different disintegration and protein/peptide release rates during simulated in vitro digestion
    (Elsevier, 2016-01-27) Fang, Xixi; Rioux, Laurie-Eve; Labrie, Steve; Turgeon, Sylvie
    Solid food disintegration in the stomach has recently been linked to food texture, which changes during digestion. This phenomenon is likely to affect the kinetics of protein digestion and therefore associated postprandial metabolic responses. Depending upon the variety, the cheese protein and lipid content as well as the texture can be modulated, illustrating complexity. Five commercial cheeses, covering a range of textural properties, were selected and characterised. Cheese particles were submitted to an in vitro digestion model to study cheese disintegration and protein/peptide release. Cheese disintegration was affected by cheese texture and composition. At the end of gastric digestion, elastic cheeses (mozzarella) were less disintegrated when compared with ripened and soft cheeses with high fat content (Camembert, aged Cheddar). The protein digestion was different amongst cheeses according to different disintegration rates. Cheese structural and textural properties, attributed to processing parameters, can be used to modulate gastro-intestinal digestion of cheese proteins.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Identification of texture parameters influencing commercial cheese matrix disintegration and lipid digestion using an in vitro static digestion model
    (New York, NY : Elsevier Science Pub. Co., 2019-03-26) Guinot, Léa; Rioux, Laurie-Eve; Labrie, Steve; Britten, Michel; Turgeon, Sylvie
    Cheese characteristics, such as composition or textural properties, can impact the matrix degradation rate which could modulate the bioaccessibility of fatty acids during digestion. The aim of this study was to identify texture parameters influencing cheese degradation in a gastrointestinal environment. A static in vitro digestion model has been used on nine commercial cheeses: young and aged cheddar, regular and light cream cheese, parmesan, feta, camembert, mozzarella, and sliced processed cheese. At the end of gastric digestion, camembert and mozzarella presented the lowest matrix disintegration whereas aged cheddar, regular and light cream cheeses showed the highest. For all cheeses, the fatty acid release was fast during the first 30 min of duodenal digestion and slowed down afterwards. A partial least square regression revealed that springiness, cohesiveness, and hardness were negatively correlated to the rate of cheese disintegration during gastric digestion. In addition, textural parameters were not correlated with free fatty acid release. By modulating cheese texture, it could be possible to influence matrix disintegration during gastrointestinal digestion which could have an impact on lipids release.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Effect of calcium enrichment of Cheddar cheese on its structure, in vitro digestion and lipid bioaccessibility
    (Oxford : Elsevier Ltd., 2015-09-28) Ayala-Bribiesca, Erik; Lussier, Martine; Chabot, Denise; Turgeon, Sylvie; Britten, Michel
    The nutritional role of cheese is usually reduced to its composition, often neglecting the effect that the matrix can have on digestion. The purpose of this study was to establish a link between the characteristics of Cheddar cheeses with different calcium levels and the impact on cheese in vitro digestion. Curds were enriched with CaCl2 during the salting step to produce control, high-calcium, and very high-calcium cheeses. Cheese composition, texture and structure were characterized, and physical disintegration and lipolysis were monitored during in vitro digestion. Cheese hardness increased with higher calcium content. This resulted in a slower disintegration during in vitro digestion. Despite showing faster disintegration, the control cheese had the slowest lipolysis progression. The results suggest that lipolysis depends on calcium content and the matrix modulating the access of enzymes to their substrates. Further studies should provide a better understanding of the calcium–matrix interaction affecting lipid bioaccessibility.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Disintegration and nutrients release from cheese with different textural properties during in vitro digestion
    (New York : Elsevier, 2016-09-12) Fang, Xixi; Rioux, Laurie-Eve; Labrie, Steve; Turgeon, Sylvie
    Recent results showed that solid food disintegration in the stomach may be affected by food texture which was demonstrated to change during digestion. Cheese is complex as, depending on the variety, its composition and texture can be modulated. Cheddar, light Cheddar, Mozzarella and light Mozzarella cheese particles were digested in vitro. Cheese disintegration and nutrients release were studied throughout the oral, gastric and duodenal digestion steps in presence or absence of enzymes. Cheese disintegration was significantly affected by the enzymatic treatment (with or without enzymes). The addition of enzymes allowed to reach 72% of cheese disintegration at the end of the duodenal digestion while it has attained 30% when no enzymes were added. Cheddar cheese disintegration was the highest among cheeses. This phenomenon was related to its initial higher fat content which resulted in a higher fat release during digestion. The disintegration at the end of each digestion step was also correlated to cheese composition (proteolysis and fat) and to textural parameters (hardness, resilience, adhesiveness and chewiness). Light Cheddar and Mozzarella exhibited similar disintegration and nutrients release at the end of the digestion due to a relatively small fat reduction (6%) which had limited effect on cheese texture. This study provides quantitative evidence regarding the impact of cheese textural changes during digestion on cheese disintegration and macronutrients release which may further affect nutrients anabolic response and some physiological functions.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Postprandial lipemia and fecal fat excretion in rats is affected by the calcium content and type of milk fat present in Cheddar-type cheeses
    (New York, NY : Elsevier Science, 2018-03-21) Ayala-Bribiesca, Erik; Turgeon, Sylvie; Pilon, Geneviève; Britten, Michel; Marette, André.
    The aim of this study was to better understand the effect of calcium on the bioavailability of milk lipids from a cheese matrix using a rat model. Cheddar-type cheeses were manufactured with one of three types of anhydrous milk fat, control, olein or stearin, and salted with or without CaCl₂. The cheeses were fed to rats and postprandial lipemia was monitored. Feces were analyzed to quantify fatty acids excreted as calcium soaps. Higher calcium concentration in cheese caused a higher and faster triacylglycerol peak in blood, except for cheeses containing stearin. Furthermore, calcium soaps were more abundant in feces when the ingested cheese had been enriched with calcium and when the cheese was prepared with stearin. Increased lipid excretion was attributable to the affinity of saturated long-chain fatty acids for calcium. Results showed that lipid bioaccessibility can be regulated by calcium present in Cheddar cheese. This study highlights the nutritional interaction between calcium and lipids present in the dairy matrix and confirms its physiological repercussions on fatty acid bioavailability.