Personne :
Guillaumie, Laurence

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Guillaumie
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Laurence
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Université Laval. Faculté des sciences infirmières
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ncf11859401
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Résultats de recherche

Voici les éléments 1 - 4 sur 4
  • Publication
    Restreint
    Psychosocial factors associated with pharmacists’ antidepressant drug treatment monitoring.
    (American Pharmacists Association, 2020-03-12) Grégoire, Jean-Pierre; Guillaumie, Laurence; Humphries, Brittany; Lauzier, Sophie; Moisan, Jocelyne; Villeneuve, Denis
    Objective: Patients undergoing antidepressant drug treatment (ADT) may face challenges regarding its adverse effects, adherence, and efficacy. Community pharmacists are well positioned to manage ADT-related problems. Little is known about the factors influencing pharmacists’ ADT monitoring. This study aimed to identify the psychosocial factors associated with pharmacists’ intention to perform systematic ADT monitoring and report on this monitoring. Design: Cross-sectional study based on the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Setting and participants: Community pharmacists in the province of Quebec, Canada. Outcome measures: Pharmacists completed a questionnaire on their performance of ADT monitoring, TPB constructs (intention; attitude; subjective norm; perceived behavioral control; and attitudinal, normative, and control beliefs), and professional identity. Systematic ADT monitoring was defined as pharmacists’ reporting 4 or more consultations with each patient during the first year of ADT to address adverse effects, adherence, and efficacy. Hierarchical linear regression models were used to identify the factors associated with the intention and reporting of systematic ADT monitoring and Poisson working models to identify the beliefs associated with intention. Results: A total of 1609 pharmacists completed the questionnaire (participation ¼ 29.6%). Systematic ADT monitoring was not widely reported (mean score ¼ 2.0 out of 5.0), and intention was moderate (mean ¼ 3.2). Pharmacists’ intention was the sole psychosocial factor associated with reporting systematic ADT monitoring (P < 0.0001; R2 ¼ 0.370). All TPB constructs and professional identity were associated with intention (P < 0.0001; R2 ¼ 0.611). Perceived behavioral control had the strongest association. Conclusion: Interventions to promote systematic ADT monitoring should focus on developing a strong intention among pharmacists, which could, in turn, influence their practice. To influence intention, priority should be given to ensuring that pharmacists feel capable of performing this monitoring. The main barriers to overcome were the presence of only 1 pharmacist at work and limited time. Other factors identified offer complementary intervention targets.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Evaluating determinants of employees’ pro-environmental behavioral intentions
    (Bingley Emerald, 2020-02-24) Guillaumie, Laurence; Boiral, Olivier; Yuriev, Alexander
    Purpose – The aim of this study was to identify and quantitatively assess the importance of psychosocial and organizational factors that influence employees’ intentions to engage in pro-environmental behaviors at the workplace. Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire based on the theory of planned behavior was completed by 318 employees. To validate three suggested hypotheses, a series of path analysis models were constructed using AMOS software. Findings – The theory of planned behavior explained 79 percent and 37.7 percent of variance in predicting intentions of employees to travel to work using alternative transportation and to make eco-suggestions directed toward the workplace, respectively. While organizational barriers did not play a significant role in predicting intentions to use alternative transportation, some organizational obstacles (opinion of colleagues, required paperwork) influenced workers’ intention to make eco-suggestions. Originality/value – This is one of the first articles in the field of pro-environmental workplace behaviors in which the theory of planned behavior is implemented in a systematic manner (qualitative exploration of beliefs followed by their quantitative evaluation). This article contributes to the existing literature by shedding light on the disproportionate influence of organizational and psychosocial factors on pro-environmental workplace behaviors
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Women's beliefs on early adherence to adjuvant endocrine therapy for breast cancer : a theory-based qualitative study to guide the development of community pharmacist interventions
    (MDPI, 2018-06-09) Guillaumie, Laurence; Provencher, Louise; Humphries, Brittany; Lemieux, Julie.; Lauzier, Sophie; Moisan, Jocelyne; Dionne, Anne; Collins, Stéphanie
    Adjuvant endocrine therapy (AET) taken for a minimum of five years reduces the recurrence and mortality risks among women with hormone-sensitive breast cancer. However, adherence to AET is suboptimal. To guide the development of theory-based interventions to enhance AET adherence, we conducted a study to explore beliefs regarding early adherence to AET. This qualitative study was guided by the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). We conducted focus groups and individual interviews among women prescribed AET in the last two years (n = 43). The topic guide explored attitudinal (perceived advantages and disadvantages), normative (perception of approval or disapproval), and control beliefs (barriers and facilitating factors) towards adhering to AET. Thematic analysis was conducted. Most women had a positive attitude towards AET regardless of their medication-taking behavior. The principal perceived advantage was protection against a recurrence while the principal inconvenience was side effects. Almost everyone approved of the woman taking her medication. The women mentioned facilitating factors to encourage medication-taking behaviors and cope with side effects. For adherent women, having trouble establishing a routine was their main barrier to taking medication. For non-adherent women, it was side effects affecting their quality of life. These findings could inform the development of community pharmacy-based adherence interventions.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Pro-environmental behaviors through the lens of the theory of planned behavior : a scoping review
    (Elsevier, 2020-01-09) Guillaumie, Laurence; Paillé, Pascal; Boiral, Olivier; Dahmen, Mehdi; Yuriev, Alexander
    The theory of planned behavior (TPB) allows researchers to identify the determinants of environmental behavior and subsequently target these factors in interventions. Multiple studies on conservation behaviors have recently applied this theoretical framework in both organizational and domestic settings. To shed more light on how the TPB was used in these studies, we conducted a literature review with the following objectives: 1) explore which individual green behaviors were studied though the lens of the TPB, 2) understand how scholars have used the theory and what variance the theory has helped to explain, and 3) formulate recommendations, if necessary, for improving the use of the theory. The review of the results from 126 publications demonstrated that the majority of scholars tend to overlook the importance of identifying and evaluating indirect variables (beliefs) that affect behaviors. More than half of the analyzed articles did not report the amount of explained variance, which undermines the principal strength of the theory. Scholars could obtain more substantial and consistent results if the guidelines regarding the application of the theory are consistently respected. More specifically, four aspects should be considered in the application of the theory: choice of framework, decision to extend the original model, methodology, and results. To help scholars overcome these commonly encountered problems, this article suggests a roadmap with several guiding questions and possible answers.