Personne :
Guillaumie, Laurence

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Guillaumie
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Laurence
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Université Laval. Faculté des sciences infirmières
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ncf11859401
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Résultats de recherche

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  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Correlates of sugar-sweetened beverages consumption among adolescents
    (CABI Publishing, 2020-05-08) Vézina-Im, Lydi-Anne; Guillaumie, Laurence; Turcotte, Stéphane; Boucher, Danielle; Douville, Frédéric; Beaulieu, Dominique
    Objective: To identify correlates and underlying beliefs regarding the adolescents’ intention to abstain from consuming sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB) and the consumption of ≤1 daily portion of SSB. Design: Correlational study. Setting: Region of Chaudière-Appalaches in the province of Quebec, Canada. Participants: 311 adolescents aged 13–18 years completed a self-administrated online questionnaire based on the Reasoned Action Approach. Frequency and quantity of different types of SSB within the past month were measured. Results: Total mean SSB intake was 882·6 ml/d (654·0 kJ/d ). Only 11·3 % abstained from SSB within the last month. Intention to abstain from SSB was explained by identification as SSB abstainers ( β = 0·47), perceived norm ( β = 0·32), attitude ( β = 0·30), age 13–14 years ( β = –0·27) and perception of the school environment ( β = 0·14), which explained 66 % of the variance. Consumption of ≤1 daily portion of SSB was explained by the intention to abstain (OR = 1·55; 95 % CI 1·14, 2·11), perceived behavioural control to abstain (OR = 1·80; 95 % CI 1·29, 2·52), sex (girls v. boys: OR = 2·34; 95 % CI 1·37, 3·98) and socio-economic status (advantaged v. disadvantaged school: OR = 2·08; 95 % CI 1·21, 3·56). Underlying beliefs (i.e. more energy, decreased risk of addiction and friends’ approval) associated with intention as well as perceived barriers (e.g. access to SSB, after an activity that makes you thirsty), and facilitating factors (e.g. access to water) linked to SSB consumption were identified. Conclusions: The results can inform public health interventions to decrease SSB consumption and their associated health problems among adolescents.
  • Publication
    Restreint
    Self-efficacy and implementation intentions-based interventions on fruit and vegetable intake among adults : impact at 12-month follow-up
    (Sage, 2013-05-15) Guillaumie, Laurence; Godin, Gaston; Manderscheid, Jean-Claude; Spitz, Elisabeth; Muller, Laurent
    This study tested the effect of theory-based interventions designed to increase fruit and vegetable intake (FVI). Adults (n = 291) were randomized into four groups: implementation intentions (II) group; self-efficacy (SE) group; combination of implementation intentions and self-efficacy (II+SE) group; and a control group receiving written information on nutrition. They were reassessed at 1, 3, 6 and 12 month follow-up. This study found that short interventions such as SE and II+SE can achieve significant differences in FVI at six-month follow-up compared to the control group. However, this effect was not maintained at 12-month follow-up. Practitioners should add materials or follow up meetings to ensure maintenance of behavioral change.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Psychosocial determinants of fruit and vegetable intake in adult population : a systematic review
    (BioMed Central, 2010-02-02) Vézina-Im, Lydi-Anne; Guillaumie, Laurence; Godin, Gaston
    Background: Accumulating evidence suggests that fruit and vegetable intake (FVI) plays a protective role against major diseases. Despite this protective role and the obesity pandemic context, populations in Western countries usually eat far less than five servings of fruits and vegetables per day. In order to increase the efficiency of interventions, they should be tailored to the most important determinants or mediators of FVI. The objective was to systematically review social cognitive theory-based studies of FVI and to identify its main psychosocial determinants. Methods: Published papers were systematically sought using Current Contents (2007-2009) and Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, Proquest and Thesis, as well as Cinhal (1980-2009). Additional studies were identified by a manual search in the bibliographies. Search terms included fruit, vegetable, behaviour, intention, as well as names of specific theories. Only studies predicting FVI or intention to eat fruits and vegetables in the general population and using a social cognitive theory were included. Independent extraction of information was carried out by two persons using predefined data fields, including study quality criteria. Results: A total of 23 studies were identified and included, 15 studying only the determinants of FVI, seven studying the determinants of FVI and intention and one studying only the determinants of intention. All pooled analyses were based on random-effects models. The random-effect R2 observed for the prediction of FVI was 0.23 and it was 0.34 for the prediction of intention. Multicomponent theoretical frameworks and the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) were most often used. A number of methodological moderators influenced the efficacy of prediction of FVI. The most consistent variables predicting behaviour were habit, motivation and goals, beliefs about capabilities, knowledge and taste; those explaining intention were beliefs about capabilities, beliefs about consequences and perceived social influences. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the TPB and social cognitive theory (SCT) are the preferable social cognitive theories to predict behaviour and TPB to explain intention. Efficacy of prediction was nonetheless negatively affected by methodological factors such as the study design and the quality of psychosocial and behavioural measures.