Personne :
Guillaumie, Laurence

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Guillaumie
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Laurence
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Université Laval. Faculté des sciences infirmières
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ncf11859401
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Résultats de recherche

Voici les éléments 1 - 5 sur 5
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Adoption and outcomes of ISO 14001 : a systematic review
    (Blackwell Publishers, 2017-02-14) Guillaumie, Laurence; Boiral, Olivier; Heras-Saizarbitoria, Iñaki; Tayo Tene, Christian Valery
    The objective of this paper is to analyze the adoption and outcomes of the ISO 14001 standard through a systematic review of the main studies on this issue published in peer-reviewed journals between 1996 and 2015. The 94 papers analyzed make it possible to paint a comprehensive picture of the effectiveness of ISO 14001 in environmental management practices, performance in this area and social aspects such as employee awareness. The systematic review also sheds more light on the main pitfalls and success factors of the standard. Nevertheless, the similarities and even redundancies of the literature in terms of objectives, approaches and methods used tend to produce quite predictable and optimistic results, which do not reflect the complexity of the impact of ISO 14001. The paper highlights the importance of more diverse and critical approaches that might challenge the successful rhetoric of the dominant literature, which tends to focus on positive aspects and be limited to a few countries that are not representative of the wide international distribution of certification. The findings of this systematic review can also help managers in making decisions on the adoption and renewal of certification.
  • Publication
    Restreint
    Effectiveness and content analysis of interventions to enhance oral antidiabetic drug adherence in adults with type2 diabetes : systematic review and meta-analysis
    (Elsevier, 2015-05-23) Grégoire, Jean-Pierre; Bruin, Marijn de; Vézina-Im, Lydi-Anne; Guillaumie, Laurence; Pérez Herrera, Norma Maria; Zomahoun, Hervé Tchala Vignon; Moisan, Jocelyne; Guénette, Line
    Objectives: To estimate the pooled effect size of oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) adherence-enhancing interventions and to explore which of the behavior change techniques (BCTs) applied in the intervention groups modified this pooled intervention effect size. Methods: We searched relevant studies published until September 3, 2013, on MEDLINE, Embase, PsycInfo, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Current Contents Connect, and Web of Science. Selected studies were qualitatively synthesized, and those of at least medium quality were included in the meta-analysis. A random-effects model was used to pool effectiveness (Hedges’s g) and to examine heterogeneity (Higgins I2). We also explored the influence on the pooled effectiveness of unique intervention BCTs (those delivered to the intervention groups but not control groups in a trial) by estimating their modifying effects. Results: Fourteen studies were selected for the qualitative synthesis and 10 were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled effectiveness of the interventions was 0.21 (95% confidence interval −0.05 to 0.47; I2 = 82%). Eight unique BCTs were analyzed. “Cope with side effects” (P = 0.003) and “general intention formation” (P = 0.006) had a modifying effect on the pooled effectiveness. The pooled effectiveness of the interventions in which “cope with side effects” was applied was moderate (0.64; 95% confidence interval 0.31–0.96; I2 = 56%). Conclusions: The overall effectiveness of OAD adherence-enhancing interventions that have been tested is small. Helping patients cope with side effects or formulate desired treatment outcomes could have an impact on the effectiveness of OAD adherence-enhancing interventions. Only those interventions that include helping patients to cope with side effects appear to be particularly effective in improving OAD adherence.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    A mixed-methods systematic review of the effects of mindfulness on nurses
    (Wiley Online Library, 2016-10-05) Guillaumie, Laurence; Boiral, Olivier; Champagne, Julie
    Aim: To review the effects of mindfulness-based interventions on Registered Nurses and nursing students. Background: Work-related stress among nurses is estimated to be the biggest occupational health problem after musculoskeletal disorders. Design: A mixed-method systematic review incorporating quantitative and qualitative data was conducted. Data sources: Studies on the effects of mindfulness-based interventions for nurses and nursing students published between 1980 and 2014 were identified through a systematic search in electronic databases: Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library and Cinahl. Review methods: Data analysis was conducted based on the framework of Thomas and Harden (2004). Results: A total of 32 studies, including 17 controlled designs, 11 pre-post designs and four qualitative designs were reviewed. Meta-analysis suggests that mindfulness-based interventions may be effective in significantly reducing state anxiety and depression at posttreatment and state anxiety and trait anxiety at follow-up. Qualitative studies and uncontrolled studies shed light on benefits overlooked in RCTs, including improvements in the well-being of individuals (e.g. inner state of calmness, awareness and enthusiasm) and improved performance at work (better communication with colleagues and patients, higher sensitivity to patients' experiences, clearer analysis of complex situations and emotional regulation in stressful contexts). Conclusions: Mindfulness appeared to improve nurses' mental health significantly. It could be used in worksite health promotion programmes. Only a few studies have explored the impact of mindfulness on nurses' professional behaviours and their relationships with patients and colleagues. Future research should further explore the long-term impacts of mindfulness on performance and well-being at work using sound methodological designs.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Psychosocial determinants of fruit and vegetable intake in adult population : a systematic review
    (BioMed Central, 2010-02-02) Vézina-Im, Lydi-Anne; Guillaumie, Laurence; Godin, Gaston
    Background: Accumulating evidence suggests that fruit and vegetable intake (FVI) plays a protective role against major diseases. Despite this protective role and the obesity pandemic context, populations in Western countries usually eat far less than five servings of fruits and vegetables per day. In order to increase the efficiency of interventions, they should be tailored to the most important determinants or mediators of FVI. The objective was to systematically review social cognitive theory-based studies of FVI and to identify its main psychosocial determinants. Methods: Published papers were systematically sought using Current Contents (2007-2009) and Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, Proquest and Thesis, as well as Cinhal (1980-2009). Additional studies were identified by a manual search in the bibliographies. Search terms included fruit, vegetable, behaviour, intention, as well as names of specific theories. Only studies predicting FVI or intention to eat fruits and vegetables in the general population and using a social cognitive theory were included. Independent extraction of information was carried out by two persons using predefined data fields, including study quality criteria. Results: A total of 23 studies were identified and included, 15 studying only the determinants of FVI, seven studying the determinants of FVI and intention and one studying only the determinants of intention. All pooled analyses were based on random-effects models. The random-effect R2 observed for the prediction of FVI was 0.23 and it was 0.34 for the prediction of intention. Multicomponent theoretical frameworks and the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) were most often used. A number of methodological moderators influenced the efficacy of prediction of FVI. The most consistent variables predicting behaviour were habit, motivation and goals, beliefs about capabilities, knowledge and taste; those explaining intention were beliefs about capabilities, beliefs about consequences and perceived social influences. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the TPB and social cognitive theory (SCT) are the preferable social cognitive theories to predict behaviour and TPB to explain intention. Efficacy of prediction was nonetheless negatively affected by methodological factors such as the study design and the quality of psychosocial and behavioural measures.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Pro-environmental behaviors through the lens of the theory of planned behavior : a scoping review
    (Elsevier, 2020-01-09) Guillaumie, Laurence; Paillé, Pascal; Boiral, Olivier; Dahmen, Mehdi; Yuriev, Alexander
    The theory of planned behavior (TPB) allows researchers to identify the determinants of environmental behavior and subsequently target these factors in interventions. Multiple studies on conservation behaviors have recently applied this theoretical framework in both organizational and domestic settings. To shed more light on how the TPB was used in these studies, we conducted a literature review with the following objectives: 1) explore which individual green behaviors were studied though the lens of the TPB, 2) understand how scholars have used the theory and what variance the theory has helped to explain, and 3) formulate recommendations, if necessary, for improving the use of the theory. The review of the results from 126 publications demonstrated that the majority of scholars tend to overlook the importance of identifying and evaluating indirect variables (beliefs) that affect behaviors. More than half of the analyzed articles did not report the amount of explained variance, which undermines the principal strength of the theory. Scholars could obtain more substantial and consistent results if the guidelines regarding the application of the theory are consistently respected. More specifically, four aspects should be considered in the application of the theory: choice of framework, decision to extend the original model, methodology, and results. To help scholars overcome these commonly encountered problems, this article suggests a roadmap with several guiding questions and possible answers.