Personne :
Guillaumie, Laurence

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Guillaumie
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Laurence
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Université Laval. Faculté des sciences infirmières
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ncf11859401
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Résultats de recherche

Voici les éléments 1 - 5 sur 5
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Adoption and outcomes of ISO 14001 : a systematic review
    (Blackwell Publishers, 2017-02-14) Guillaumie, Laurence; Boiral, Olivier; Heras-Saizarbitoria, Iñaki; Tayo Tene, Christian Valery
    The objective of this paper is to analyze the adoption and outcomes of the ISO 14001 standard through a systematic review of the main studies on this issue published in peer-reviewed journals between 1996 and 2015. The 94 papers analyzed make it possible to paint a comprehensive picture of the effectiveness of ISO 14001 in environmental management practices, performance in this area and social aspects such as employee awareness. The systematic review also sheds more light on the main pitfalls and success factors of the standard. Nevertheless, the similarities and even redundancies of the literature in terms of objectives, approaches and methods used tend to produce quite predictable and optimistic results, which do not reflect the complexity of the impact of ISO 14001. The paper highlights the importance of more diverse and critical approaches that might challenge the successful rhetoric of the dominant literature, which tends to focus on positive aspects and be limited to a few countries that are not representative of the wide international distribution of certification. The findings of this systematic review can also help managers in making decisions on the adoption and renewal of certification.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    A mixed-methods systematic review of the effects of mindfulness on nurses
    (Wiley Online Library, 2016-10-05) Guillaumie, Laurence; Boiral, Olivier; Champagne, Julie
    Aim: To review the effects of mindfulness-based interventions on Registered Nurses and nursing students. Background: Work-related stress among nurses is estimated to be the biggest occupational health problem after musculoskeletal disorders. Design: A mixed-method systematic review incorporating quantitative and qualitative data was conducted. Data sources: Studies on the effects of mindfulness-based interventions for nurses and nursing students published between 1980 and 2014 were identified through a systematic search in electronic databases: Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library and Cinahl. Review methods: Data analysis was conducted based on the framework of Thomas and Harden (2004). Results: A total of 32 studies, including 17 controlled designs, 11 pre-post designs and four qualitative designs were reviewed. Meta-analysis suggests that mindfulness-based interventions may be effective in significantly reducing state anxiety and depression at posttreatment and state anxiety and trait anxiety at follow-up. Qualitative studies and uncontrolled studies shed light on benefits overlooked in RCTs, including improvements in the well-being of individuals (e.g. inner state of calmness, awareness and enthusiasm) and improved performance at work (better communication with colleagues and patients, higher sensitivity to patients' experiences, clearer analysis of complex situations and emotional regulation in stressful contexts). Conclusions: Mindfulness appeared to improve nurses' mental health significantly. It could be used in worksite health promotion programmes. Only a few studies have explored the impact of mindfulness on nurses' professional behaviours and their relationships with patients and colleagues. Future research should further explore the long-term impacts of mindfulness on performance and well-being at work using sound methodological designs.
  • Publication
    Restreint
    Empowering nurses to provide humanized care in Canadian hospital care units : a qualitative study
    (hnpjournal, 2020-10-01) Guillaumie, Laurence; Desgroseilliers, Valérie; Boiral, Olivier; Roy, Bernard; Vonarx, Nicolas
    Previous studies have reported a conflict between nurses’ motivation to provide humanized care and practical requirements impeding them from doing so. This exploratory descriptive qualitative study aimed to explore nurses’ perspectives on humanized care, the challenges they face, and, most importantly, their recommendations to overcome these barriers. Semistructured individual interviews were conducted with 17 auxiliary and registered nurses working in various health care units in a Canadian hospital. Participants demonstrated a good understanding of what humanized care covers and entails. They also described it as the very core of their profession and main source of job satisfaction. However, nurses reported that they are confronted with organizational barriers, mainly a lack of staff, the burden of administrative tasks, unsuitable physical environments or equipment, and little managerial support. Nurses stressed the need for a cultural change in managerial practices in order to be able to improve their provision of humanized care. Based on the findings, 4 structuring recommendations were identified: adopting an institutional policy promoting the implementation of humanized care, incorporating humanized care in nurses’ tasks and procedures, improving participatory management, and ensuring adequate staffing.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Evaluating determinants of employees’ pro-environmental behavioral intentions
    (Bingley Emerald, 2020-02-24) Guillaumie, Laurence; Boiral, Olivier; Yuriev, Alexander
    Purpose – The aim of this study was to identify and quantitatively assess the importance of psychosocial and organizational factors that influence employees’ intentions to engage in pro-environmental behaviors at the workplace. Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire based on the theory of planned behavior was completed by 318 employees. To validate three suggested hypotheses, a series of path analysis models were constructed using AMOS software. Findings – The theory of planned behavior explained 79 percent and 37.7 percent of variance in predicting intentions of employees to travel to work using alternative transportation and to make eco-suggestions directed toward the workplace, respectively. While organizational barriers did not play a significant role in predicting intentions to use alternative transportation, some organizational obstacles (opinion of colleagues, required paperwork) influenced workers’ intention to make eco-suggestions. Originality/value – This is one of the first articles in the field of pro-environmental workplace behaviors in which the theory of planned behavior is implemented in a systematic manner (qualitative exploration of beliefs followed by their quantitative evaluation). This article contributes to the existing literature by shedding light on the disproportionate influence of organizational and psychosocial factors on pro-environmental workplace behaviors
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Pro-environmental behaviors through the lens of the theory of planned behavior : a scoping review
    (Elsevier, 2020-01-09) Guillaumie, Laurence; Paillé, Pascal; Boiral, Olivier; Dahmen, Mehdi; Yuriev, Alexander
    The theory of planned behavior (TPB) allows researchers to identify the determinants of environmental behavior and subsequently target these factors in interventions. Multiple studies on conservation behaviors have recently applied this theoretical framework in both organizational and domestic settings. To shed more light on how the TPB was used in these studies, we conducted a literature review with the following objectives: 1) explore which individual green behaviors were studied though the lens of the TPB, 2) understand how scholars have used the theory and what variance the theory has helped to explain, and 3) formulate recommendations, if necessary, for improving the use of the theory. The review of the results from 126 publications demonstrated that the majority of scholars tend to overlook the importance of identifying and evaluating indirect variables (beliefs) that affect behaviors. More than half of the analyzed articles did not report the amount of explained variance, which undermines the principal strength of the theory. Scholars could obtain more substantial and consistent results if the guidelines regarding the application of the theory are consistently respected. More specifically, four aspects should be considered in the application of the theory: choice of framework, decision to extend the original model, methodology, and results. To help scholars overcome these commonly encountered problems, this article suggests a roadmap with several guiding questions and possible answers.