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Guzzetti, Ezequiel

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Ezequiel
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Université Laval
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Voici les éléments 1 - 10 sur 16
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Sex-related differences in the extent of myocardial fibrosis in patients with aortic valve stenosis
    (American College of Cardiology Foundation, 2018-09-22) Guzzetti, Ezequiel; Kwiecinski, Jacek; Larose, Éric; Shen, Mylène; Bédard, Élisabeth; Everett, Russell J.; Capoulade, Romain; Newby, David E.; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Pibarot, Philippe; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Tastet, Lionel; Arsenault, Marie; Dweck, Marc
  • Publication
    Restreint
    Paravalvular regurgitation after transcatheter aortic valve replacement. Is the problem solved?
    (Elsevier, 2018-10-01) Dahou, Abdellaziz; Guzzetti, Ezequiel; Annabi, Mohamed Salah; Pibarot, Philippe; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Toubal, Oumhani; Ong, Géraldine; Salaun, Erwan
    Paravalvular regurgitation is a frequent complication after transcatheter aortic valve replacement and its association with worse outcomes depends on the degree of its severity. Despite substantial improvement in transcatheter heart valve design, sizing and implantation technique, moderate or severe paravalvular regurgitation still occurs in 2% to 7% of patients and is associated with a more than 2-fold increase in mortality. This review provides a state-of-the-art approach to (i) paravalvular regurgitation prevention by optimizing patient selection, valve sizing, and positioning and (ii) the detection, quantitation and management of paravalvular regurgitation during and after valve implantation.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Transvalvular flow, sex, and survival after valve replacement surgery in patients with severe aortic stenosis
    (Elsevier, 2020-04-28) Bilodeau, Anthony; Guzzetti, Ezequiel; Kalavrouziotis, Dimitri; Zhang, Bin; Couture, Christian; Annabi, Mohamed Salah; Pibarot, Philippe; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Dagenais, François.
    Background : The respective impacts of transvalvular flow, gradient, sex, and their interactions on mortality in patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement (AVR) are unknown. Objectives : This study sought to compare the impact of pre-operative flow-gradient patterns on mortality after AVR and to examine whether there are sex differences. Methods : This study analyzed clinical, echocardiographic, and outcome data prospectively collected in 1,490 patients (544 women [37%]), with severe aortic stenosis and preserved left ventricular ejection fraction who underwent AVR. Results : In this cohort, 601 patients (40%) had normal flow (NF) with high gradient (HG), 405 (27%) NF with low gradient (LG), 246 (17%) paradoxical low flow (LF)/HG, and 238 (16%) LF/LG. During a median follow-up of 2.42 years (interquartile range: 1.04 to 4.29 years), 167 patients died. Patients with LF/HG exhibited the highest mortality after AVR (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.01; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.33 to 3.03; p < 0.01), which remained significant after multivariate adjustment (HR: 1.96; 95% CI: 1.29 to 2.98; p < 0.01). Both LF/LG and NF/LG patients had comparable outcome to NF/HG (p ≥ 0.47). Optimal thresholds of stroke volume index were obtained for men (40 ml/m2) and women (32 ml/m2). Using these sex-specific cutpoints, paradoxical LF was independently associated with increased mortality in both women (adjusted HR: 2.05; 95% CI: 1.21 to 3.47; p < 0.01) and men (adjusted HR: 1.54; 95% CI: 1.02 to 2.32; p = 0.042), whereas guidelines’ threshold (35 ml/m2) does not. Conclusions : Paradoxical LF/HG was associated with higher mortality following AVR, suggesting that a reduced flow is a marker of disease severity even in patients with HG aortic stenosis. Early surgical AVR (i.e., before gradient attains 40 mm Hg) might be preferable in these patients. Furthermore, the use of sex-specific thresholds (<40 ml/m2 for men and <32 ml/m2 for women) to define low-flow outperforms the guidelines’ threshold of 35 ml/m2 in risk stratification after AVR.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Usefulness of energy loss index for adjudication of low-gradient aortic stenosis severity
    (Oxford University Press, 2020-04-07) Guzzetti, Ezequiel; Pibarot, Philippe; Clavel, Marie-Annick
    Up to 40% of patients with aortic stenosis (AS) present with a low gradient (i.e., a mean transvalvular gradient [MG] <40 mmHg) despite a small aortic valve area (AVA≤1 cm2) at echocardiography or cardiac catheterization. This ‘discordant grading’ situation raises uncertainty about the true severity of AS and therefore about therapeutic decision making (1). A thorough, integrative approach including assessment of flow status and quantitation of aortic valve calcium score by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has been proposed in the 2017 European guidelines for discriminating true versus pseudo-severe AS in the patients with low-gradient AS (2). It is, indeed, estimated that 50 to 70% of patients with low-gradient AS have a true-severe AS and thus an indication (Class I or IIa) for aortic valve replacement. However, it remains crucial to identify patients with pseudo-severe AS, who should be managed conservatively.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Normal-flow low-gradient severe aortic stenosis is a frequent and real entity
    (Oxford University Press, 2019-08-22) Guzzetti, Ezequiel; Pibarot, Philippe; Clavel, Marie-Annick
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Sex-related differences in the extent of myocardial fibrosis in patients with aortic valve stenosis
    (American College of Cardiology, 2019-08-14) Guzzetti, Ezequiel; Kwiecinski, Jacek; Larose, Éric; Shen, Mylène; Bédard, Élisabeth; Everett, Russell J.; Capoulade, Romain; Newby, David E.; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Pibarot, Philippe; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Tastet, Lionel; Arsenault, Marie; Dweck, Marc
    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the effect of sex on myocardial fibrosis as assessed by using cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging in aortic stenosis (AS). Background: Previous studies reported sex-related differences in the left ventricular (LV) remodeling response to pressure overload in AS. However, there are very few data regarding the effect of sex on myocardial fibrosis, a key marker of LV decompensation and adverse cardiac events in AS. Methods: A total of 249 patients (mean age 66 ± 13 years; 30% women) with at least mild AS were recruited from 2 prospective observational cohort studies and underwent comprehensive Doppler echocardiography and CMR examinations. On CMR, T1 mapping was used to quantify extracellular volume (ECV) fraction as a marker of diffuse fibrosis, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was used to assess focal fibrosis. Results: There was no difference in age between women and men (age 66 ± 15 years vs 66 ± 12 years; p = 0.78). However, women presented with a better cardiovascular risk profile than men with less hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes, and coronary artery disease (all, p ≤ 0.10). As expected, LV mass index measured by CMR imaging was smaller in women than in men (p < 0.0001). Despite fewer comorbidities, women presented with larger ECV fraction (median: 29.0% [25th to 75th percentiles: 27.4% to 30.6%] vs. 26.8% [25th to 75th percentiles: 25.1% to 28.7%]; p < 0.0001) and similar LGE (median: 4.5% [25th–75th percentiles: 2.3% to 7.0%] vs. 2.8% [25th–75th percentiles: 0.6% to 6.8%]; p = 0.20) than men. In multivariable analysis, female sex remained an independent determinant of higher ECV fraction and LGE (all, p ≤ 0.05). Conclusions: Women have greater diffuse and focal myocardial fibrosis independent of the degree of AS severity. These findings further emphasize the sex-related differences in LV remodeling response to pressure overload.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Importance of flow in risk stratification of aortic stenosis.
    (Elsevier, 2020-01-01) Guzzetti, Ezequiel; Pibarot, Philippe; Clavel, Marie-Annick
  • Publication
    Restreint
    Estimation of stroke volume and aortic valve area in patients with aortic stenosis : a comparison of echocardiography versus cardiovascular magnetic resonance
    (Elsevier, 2020-06-21) Guzzetti, Ezequiel; Garcia, Julio; Larose, Éric; Le Ven, Florent; Capoulade, Romain; Pibarot, Philippe; Bédard, Élisabeth; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Tastet, Lionel; Arsenault, Marie
    Background: In aortic stenosis, accurate measurement of left ventricular stroke volume (SV) is essential for the calculation of aortic valve area (AVA) and the assessment of flow status. Current American Society of Echocardiography and European Association of Cardiovascular Imaging guidelines suggest that measurements of left ventricular outflow tract diameter (LVOTd) at different levels (at the annulus vs 5 or 10 mm below) yield similar measures of SV and AVA. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the location of LVOTd measurement on the accuracy of SV and AVA measured on transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) compared with cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods: One hundred six patients with aortic stenosis underwent both TTE and CMR. SV was estimated on TTE using the continuity equation with LVOTd measurements at four locations: at the annulus and 2, 5, and 10 mm below annulus. SV was also determined on CMR using phase contrast acquired in the aorta (SVCMR-PC), and a hybrid AVACMR-PC was calculated by diving SVCMR-PC by the transthoracic echocardiographic Doppler aortic velocity-time integral. Comparison between methods was made using Bland-Altman analysis. Results: Compared with the referent method of phase-contrast CMR for the estimation of SVCMR-PC and AVACMR-PC (SVCMR-PC 83 6 16 mL, AVACMR-PC 1.27 6 0.35 cm2 ), the best agreement was obtained by measuring LVOTd at the annulus or 2 mm below (P = NS), whereas measuring 5 and 10 mm below the annulus resulted in significant underestimation of SV and AVA by up to 15.9 6 17.3 mL and 0.24 6 0.28 cm2 , respectively (P < .01 for all). Accuracy for classification of low flow was best at the annulus (86%) and 2 mm below (82%), whereas measuring 5 and 10 mm below the annulus significantly underperformed (69% and 61%, respectively, P < .001). Conclusions: Measuring LVOTd at the annulus or very close to it provides the most accurate measures of SV and AVA, whereas measuring LVOTd 5 or 10 mm below significantly underestimates these parameters and leads to significant overestimation of the severity of aortic stenosis and prevalence of low-flow status.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Impact of metabolic syndrome and/or diabetes mellitus on left ventricular mass and remodeling in patients with aortic stenosis before and after aortic valve replacement
    (ScienceDirect, 2019-01-01) Guzzetti, Ezequiel; Shen, Mylène; Voisine, Pierre; Annabi, Mohamed Salah; Poirier, Paul; Piché, Marie-Eve; Zenses, Anne-Sophie; Pibarot, Philippe; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Ong, Géraldine; Dagenais, François.; Tastet, Lionel; Salaun, Erwan
    Background: In aortic stenosis (AS), metabolic syndrome (MetS) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are associated with more pronounced left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) and more concentric remodeling. We aimed to assess the impact of MetS and DM on left ventricular (LV) mass, remodeling and LV mass regression after aortic valve replacement (AVR) in patients with severe AS. Method: We included 177 patients with severe AS and preserved LVEF (>50%). All patients had comprehensive echocardiography before and one year after AVR. Results: Twenty-seven percent (27%) of patients had MetS, 21% DM and 52% neither MetS nor DM (No MetS-DM). Prior to AVR, indexed LV mass (LVMi) was higher in MetS and DM groups compared to NoMetS-DM group (56.1±14.2, 56.2±18.2 vs. 49.2±14.1 g/m2.7 respectively; p<0.01). Prevalence of LV hypertrophy was higher in MetS and DM than in NoMetS-DM patients (66%, 65% vs 44%, p<0.01) as well as LV mass to-end-diastolic volume ratio (2.10±0.44 and 2.21±0.63 vs 1.96±0.41 g/ml respectively, p=0.03). One year after AVR, decrease in LVMi was significant (p<0.001) in all 3 groups. DM and MetS were independently associated with higher baseline LVMi (p<0.05). MetS was independently associated with less LVM regression and higher LVMi 1 year after AVR. MetS and DM groups showed more residual LV hypertrophy than NoMetS-DM patients (57%, 38% and 17%, p<0.01). Conclusions: MetS and DM were independently associated with a higher preoperative LVMi and more concentric remodeling. One year after AVR, MetS was associated with less LVMi regression and higher LVMi. MetS and DM patients remained with more residual LV hypertrophy
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Effect of regional upper septal hypertrophy on echocardiographic assessment of left ventricular mass and remodeling in aortic stenosis
    (ScienceDirect, 2020-10-14) Guzzetti, Ezequiel; Garcia, Julio; Larose, Éric; Shen, Mylène; Le Ven, Florent; Bédard, Élisabeth; Capoulade, Romain; Annabi, Mohamed Salah; Pibarot, Philippe; Clavel, Marie-Annick; Tastet, Lionel; Arsenault, Marie
    Background: Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) is the reference method for evaluation of aortic stenosis (AS), and it is extensively used to quantitate left ventricular (LV) mass and volumes. Regional upper septal hypertrophy (USH) or septal bulge is a frequent finding in patients with AS and may lead to overestimation of LV mass when using linear measurements. The objective of this study was to compare estimates of LV mass obtained by two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiographic LV dimensions measured at different levels of the LV cavity with those obtained by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). Methods: One hundred six patients (mean age, 63 ± 15 years; 68% men) with AS were included in this subanalysis of the PROGRESSA study. Two-dimensional transthoracic echocardiographic measurements of LV dimensions were obtained at the basal level (BL; as recommended in guidelines), immediately below the septal bulge (BSB), and at a midventricular level (ML). Regional USH was defined as a basal interventricular septal thickness ≥ 13 mm and >1.3 times the thickness of the septal wall at the ML. Agreement between transthoracic echocardiographic and CMR measures was evaluated using Bland-Altman analysis. Results: The distribution of AS severity was mild in 23%, moderate in 57%, and severe in 20% of patients. Regional USH was present in 28 patients (26%). In the whole cohort, two-dimensional TTE overestimated LV mass (bias: BL, +60 ± 31 g; BSB, +59 ± 32 g; ML, +54 ± 32 g; P = .02). The biplane Simpson method slightly but significantly underestimated LV end-diastolic volume (bias -10 ± 20 mL, P < .001) compared with CMR. Overestimation of LV mass was more marked in patients with USH when measuring at the BL and was significantly lower when measuring LV dimensions at the ML (P < .025 vs BL and BSB). Conclusions: Two-dimensional TTE systematically overestimated LV mass and underestimated LV volumes compared with CMR. However, the bias between TTE and CMR was less important when measuring at the ML. Measurements at the BL as suggested in guidelines should be avoided, and measurements at the ML should be preferred in patients with AS, especially in those with USH.