Personne :
Desjardins, Yves

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Desjardins
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Yves
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Université Laval. Faculté des sciences de l'agriculture et de l'alimentation
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ncf10409774
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Voici les éléments 1 - 5 sur 5
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Effects of plant extracts and essential oils as feed supplements on quality and microbial traits of rabbit meat
    (Universitat Politècnica de València, Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología Animal, 2016-04-01) Kone, Amenan Prisca Nadege; Desjardins, Yves; Gosselin, André; Cinq-Mars, Dany; Saucier, Linda; Guay, Frédéric
    The effects of dietary supplementation with onion, cranberry and strawberry extracts and essentials oils on meat quality were analysed. Five groups of 48 Grimaud female weaned rabbits received the supplemented or the control ration; the experimental unit was a cage of 6  rabbits. Each experimental diet contained 10 ppm of added active ingredients. Rabbits were fed with the experimental diets for 4 wk before determining slaughter and carcass traits and determining the pH at 1 and 24 h post mortem (pHu) of the Longissimus dorsi (LD) and the Biceps femoris muscle, left and right, respectively. Cooking loss, drip loss and L*, a* and b* colour parameters were obtained for the right LD and for ground meat and antioxidant status (TBARS, DNPH, Folin Ciocalteu) was measured. Only the pHu of the LD muscle for the strawberry supplemented group was significantly lower when compared to the control group (P=0.04). However, we note that for the pH of the LD, the average was less than 6 for the meat of animals that received a diet enriched in polyphenols, compared to the control group. Plant extract supplementation did not influence meat quality traits, growth performance or oxidative stability. However, under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, our results indicate that dietary supplementation with extracts rich in polyphenols, especially with essential oils, had a small but sporadic positive effect in reducing bacterial microflora compared to the control group (P<0.05). In conclusion, plant extracts and essential oils can be used in a rabbit diet without adverse effects on performance and meat quality traits. This effect could be optimised by investigating higher doses.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Plant extracts and essential oil product as feed additives to control rabbit meat microbial quality
    (2018-12-23) Kone, Amenan Prisca Nadege; Desjardins, Yves; Gosselin, André; Cinq-Mars, Dany; Saucier, Linda; Guay, Frédéric
    The present work evaluated the effects of feed supplementation with plant extracts (onion, cranberry) and a commercial essential oil product (Xtract™) on rabbit meat quality. Five groups of 48 weaned Grimaud female rabbits each received a control ration (C) or a diet supplemented with onion extract (500 or 1000 ppm), cranberry extracts (500 ppm) and essential oil product (100 ppm) alone or in combination. Microbiological quality was evaluated on whole hind legs stored under aerobic and anaerobic conditions at 4 °C. Growth performances, feed intake and both meat composition and quality were similar amongst the experimental groups. Anyhow, meat total phenolic content was significantly higher in all supplemented ones (P < 0.001). Diet supplementation effect was observed (P < 0.05) and microbial control was improved more importantly under anaerobic conditions, notably for Total Aerobic Mesophilic counts, presumptive Pseudomonas and Enterobacteriaceae (P < 0.03). Overall, supplementation with onion extract (500 ppm) suppressed microbial growth more effectively.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Development of an encapsulation system for the protection and controlled release of antimicrobial nisin at meat cooking temperature
    (Canadian Center of Science and Education, 2013-04-24) Desjardins, Yves; Subirade, Muriel; Saucier, Linda; Boualem, Khadidja
    Nisin is an antimicrobial peptide produced by Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis widely investigated for use in foods as a natural antimicrobial. However, its effective use in meat products is restricted notably by its reaction with meat constituents (including glutathione) in raw meat. The purpose of this study was to develop an encapsulation system that would optimize nisin activity when used in meat. To achieve this goal, an encapsulation in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes was developed. DPPC liposomes were formed in phosphate buffer with or without nisin. The encapsulation efficiency of nisin in liposomes was greater than 46 ± 2%. The median size of nisin-loaded liposomes was 495 nm, compared to 170 nm for empty liposomes. The liposomes containing nisin were stable for up to 7 days at 4°C but a zone of inhibition was observed afterwards. Stability of the liposome to heat was also tested and demonstrated that above 37°C nisin was released from the melted liposomes to form zones of inhibition. Activity of free and encapsulated nisin was tested in raw and cooked ground beef (71°C). Free nisin lost its activity in raw beef but DPPC-encapsulated nisin remained active and was released upon melting of the liposome during heat treatment.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Development of an encapsulation system in food liposomes for the protection and controlled release of nisin in cooked meat products
    (2012-08-13) Desjardins, Yves; Subirade, Muriel; Saucier, Linda; Boualem, Khadidja
    Nisin is an antimicrobial peptide produced by Lactococcus lactis spp. lactis widely investigated for use in foods as a natural antimicrobial. However, its effective use in meat products is restricted notably by its reaction with meat constituents (including glutathione) in raw meat. The purpose of this study was to develop an encapsulation system that would optimize nisin activity when used in meat. To achieve this goal, an encapsulation in dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes was developed. DPPC liposomes were formed in phosphate buffer with or without nisin. The encapsulation efficiency of nisin in liposomes was greater than 46 ± 2%. The median size of nisin-loaded liposomes was 495 nm, compared to 170 nm for empty liposomes. The liposomes containing nisin were stable for up to 7 days at 4°C but a zone of inhibition was observed afterwards. Stability of the liposome to heat was also tested and demonstrated that above 37°C nisin was released from the melted liposomes to form zones of inhibition. Activity of free and encapsulated nisin was tested in raw and cooked ground beef (71°C). Free nisin lost its activity in raw beef but DPPC-encapsulated nisin remained active and was released upon melting of the liposome during heat treatment.
  • Publication
    Accès libre
    Natural sources of polyphenols as feed additives to improve rabbit meat quality
    (Éditeur non identifié, 2018-08-12) Kone, Amenan Prisca Nadege; Desjardins, Yves; Gosselin, André; Cinq-Mars, Dany; Abdelwahed, Mohamed Z.; Saucier, Linda; Guay, Frédéric