The number of autonomy-supportive relationships : are more relationships better for motivation, perceived competence, and achievement?

Authors: Guay, FrédéricRatelle, CatherineLarose, Simon; Vallerand, Robert J.; Vitaro, Frank
Abstract: Does the perception of many close relationships as autonomy-supportive make students more motivated and competent? The goal of this study was to use latent class analysis (LCA) to compare the educational correlates of having one vs. several autonomy-supportive relationships. Participants were 1406 high school students (47% boys, 52% girls). LCA revealed three groups: Group 1 (17%) included students who perceived low autonomy support by their mother, father, and teacher; Group 2 (7%) included students who perceived low autonomy support by their father, but moderate autonomy support by their mother and teacher; and Group 3 (76%) included students who perceived all sources as moderately autonomy-supportive. Results of multiple comparisons suggest that more is not necessarily better: Students in Group 2, who perceived low autonomy support by fathers, reported equivalent autonomous (intrinsic and identified) and controlled (external and introjected) regulations and perceived competence to those of students in Group 3, who perceived all sources as moderately autonomy-supportive. One difference was that Group 3 showed better academic achievement than Group 2. Results are discussed in light of research on close relationships and self-determination theory (SDT).
Document Type: Article de recherche
Issue Date: 30 July 2013
Open Access Date: Restricted access
Document version: VoR
Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.11794/13823
This document was published in: Contemporary Educational Psychology, Vol. 38 (4), 375–382 (2013)
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cedpsych.2013.07.005
Academic Press
Alternative version: 10.1016/j.cedpsych.2013.07.005
Collection:Articles publiés dans des revues avec comité de lecture

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